Alec Guinness, The Lavender Hill Mob (Charles Crichton, 1951).

Alec Guinness, The Lavender Hill Mob (Charles Crichton, 1951).

Anonymous said: can you please tag those driller killer posts to a horror movie tag please?? uwu

I generally don’t tag anything other than who’s in the frame, the film’s title and the director. Is there a special reason, like triggering, etc., that you’d like me to do this? I’m sure I’d be more than happy to oblige, I just thought I’d ask.

kinodrome:

The Driller Killer (Abel Ferrara / 1979)

brand-upon-the-brain:

The Driller Killer (Abel Ferrara, 1979)

brand-upon-the-brain:

The Driller Killer (Abel Ferrara, 1979)

nitratediva:

Raymond Chandler (July 23, 1888—March 26, 1959) makes his cameo in Double Indemnity, sitting outside Keyes’s office, reading a pulp novel.

nitratediva:

Raymond Chandler (July 23, 1888—March 26, 1959) makes his cameo in Double Indemnity, sitting outside Keyes’s office, reading a pulp novel.

lottereinigerforever:

Sam Peckinpah on the set of “The Ballad of Cable Hogue”

lottereinigerforever:

Sam Peckinpah on the set of “The Ballad of Cable Hogue”

John Hurt, The Hit (Stephen Frears, 1984).

John Hurt, The Hit (Stephen Frears, 1984).

Anonymous said: It's great that you have an understanding and appreciation for a wide variety of films, something that I believe a lot of people take for granted when they only think of Hollywood BlockBusters when they think of films. So I was wondering if you have seen Time Traveler: The Girl Who Leapt Through Time (the live action Japanese film that is one that I recommend to those starting to get more into foreign films)?

Thanks. I try to take the broadest possible spectrum of films to watch, by era, genre and country, and so on. I’ve tried to do so from the very start of my fascination with films and I’ve tried to keep it up ever since.

I haven’t seen the film you mention, but anything about time travel piques my interest automatically. Looking further it seems there’s a whole series of films based around The Girl Who Leapt Through Time, so I’ll have to investigate further. Thanks!

sophisti-cunted said: 1, 7, 39

I’ve been having computer troubles and I was avoiding trying to type extendedly on my phone, but I think I’ve gone long enough without responding, so here goes:

1: Talk about the first time you watched your favorite movie.
Let’s go with Singin’ in the Rain for this one, because it’s one of the few favourites I have that I saw as a child. I tap dance, so my parents exposed me to this film in what I guess was an attempt to show the pinnacles of tap-related achievement. Or maybe just that it’s a brilliant film. I don’t know. What I do know is that I also have very little memory of actually watching it, but I remember loving the joy and jokes, loving the dancing, loving the colours and loving Cosmo pissing around. I didn’t see it again until I was already at uni and the feeling of watching something you remember loving as a kid but having utterly little memory of is indescribable. I was filled with that same elation I had when watching it for the first time coupled with being able to appreciate it on a whole new level being a lot older and knowing a lot more about films and tap dancing and I suppose life. I guess that’s cheating a bit but there you go.

7: Talk about your biggest insecurity.
Oh gosh, I’m just a sack of bones held together by insecurities. I guess my biggest one is wondering whether I’m good enough, creatively speaking. I also wonder whether I’m good enough as a human, but I think that comes second to my creative doubts. I’ve just struggled so much getting things done and getting millions of ideas to turn into completed products, not that I don’t know how to, just that there’s something in the way and I don’t know what. And all that struggling just leads to more doubt and less finished work and in turn more doubt and I just always get insecure about whether I’m doing it right out whether what comes out is any good. That said, while it’s coming out, while it’s flowing, I am free from any of that. It’s getting there past all the neurosis that is the problem.

39: Talk about things you wish you’d known earlier.
Having a job isn’t the end of the world. Cynicism only gets you so far. I need to move out.
To be honest, a lot of the things I could have known earlier I’m fine with not having known earlier, because I think a lot of things need to take time to be understood. Sure, looking back there’s plenty of current knowledge that may have made me a better person in the past, but I’m glad to have gone through it. The above things, however, would have been useful to have realised earlier because I would probably be a lot more ahead of where I am now had I not been so stubborn/clueless.